New Council Houses completed by Bristol City Council

Families in Bristol are getting ready to move into their new homes as the next phase of council houses nears completion.
The homes are part of the council’s New Build Housing Programme which began in 2014, regenerating brownfield sites, to provide new high quality homes in key areas across the city. To date 25 new homes have been completed and occupied during the first phase of construction.
Phase 2 of the programme is now nearing completion with Deans Mead Court in Lawrence Weston the first site to complete.  Deans Mead Court is one of 11 sites across Bristol in Phase 2, aimed at delivering much needed social housing for residents of the city.
Once complete, these 11 sites will provide the city with a further 56 new homes, in addition to the 25 new homes already built.
The Mayor of Bristol has set out the commitment of building 2,000 new homes – 800 affordable – a year by 2020.
Marvin Rees, Mayor of Bristol, said: “Building new houses and addressing the shortage of adequate accommodation remains one of the key priorities for my administration.
“These new houses will provide 56 families with an affordable place to call home. Every property we build is important to the city, but we cannot do this alone, and we are working with a range of partners and organisations to build homes across the city, including a number of projects on council owned land.
“As I have said before, it is important that we are not just building houses, we are building communities where people can feel they belong.
“The best way to address the housing crisis we have in the city is to build more affordable housing, and we are continuing to look at every opportunity to accelerate our build programme. I look forward to work starting on our next batch of sites.”
Eight of the 11 sites are based in Lawrence Weston, Henbury and Brentry, and have been designed to meet the Passivhaus building standard which aims to reduce energy usage, during construction and once occupied, by adopting a “fabric first” approach that provides excellent thermal insulation.
This will result in extremely energy efficient properties which will see household utility bills dramatically reduced
The remaining live sites, two of them situated in Sea Mills, a designated conservation area, have been designed to mimic the appearance of existing properties in the area whilst meeting Level 4 of the Code for Sustainable Homes.
In addition, all of the properties built by Bristol City Council have been designed to meet the “Lifetime Homes Standard”, ensuring that they will be suitable for tenants with a wide variety of needs.
All of the sites that form part of Bristol City Council’s new build housing scheme make use of land owned by the Housing Department, with a particular focus on derelict, brownfield sites that can be brought back into use such as former garages and council depots.
The council is also about to start work on the next phase of the programme with a further four sites, which will deliver 60 new homes. These are currently either awaiting a planning decision or have just received a satisfactory planning consent.
Work on these sites, which are located in Henbury and Brislington, is scheduled to commence later this year with an estimated completion date in late 2018 or early 2019.
The team is also working on the council’s largest single development at Alderman Moores in Ashton Vale, which will see will see the council building houses for sale on the private market for the first time.
The site will be a mixed development with around 130 new homes, of which 50 will be new council houses. The scheme is shortly to be submitted for planning consent and should it be successful it is anticipated that construction works would start summer 2018.
In addition to this current work, the team are already beginning to look forward and programme the next phases of development to allow the rolling programme to continue and support the Mayor’s commitment to housing.
To keep up to date with the developments visit www.bristol.gov.uk/newcouncilhomes